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U.S. Senate passed Cybersecurity Information Sharing Act – CISA bill.

Senate intelligence committee chairman Richard Burr confers with committee vice-chair Dianne Feinstein and committee member Ron Wyden. Photograph Credit to : Pablo Martinez Monsivais/AP

Senate intelligence committee chairman Richard Burr confers with committee vice-chair Dianne Feinstein and committee member Ron Wyden. Photograph Credit to : Pablo Martinez Monsivais/AP

Senate votes in favor of bill critics including Edward Snowden say will allow the government to collect sensitive personal data unchecked.

Robyn Greene of the New America Foundation characterized the legislation as a “do-something” bill. “The Sony hack really changed the conversation,” Greene said. “You can see that in the way the administration approached cybersecurity – they stopped saying ‘This is is something that has to get done right’ and started saying ‘This is something that has to get done now’.”

The American Banking Association and the Telecommunications Industry Association (TIA) applauded the passage of the bill. “The legislation passed by the Senate today bolsters our cyber defenses by providing the liability protections needed to encourage the voluntary sharing of cyber threat information,” the TIA said in a statement. “We applaud the Senate for moving this important bill and urge Congressional leaders to act quickly to send this bill to the president’s desk.”

Cisa was negotiated and marked up in secret. Corporate lobbying group The US Chamber of Commerce has been the only consistent champion of the legislation outside the halls of the Senate; the editorial boards of the Wall Street Journal and the Washington Post both published opinions in favor of the bill today.

The data in question would come from private industry, which mines everything from credit card statements to prescription drug purchase records to target advertising and tweak product lines. Indeed, much of it is detailed financial and health information the government has never had access to in any form. The bill’s proponents said the data would be “anonymized”. READ ARTICLE HERE